Weekly Roundup

We’re back in lockdown (but not for as long...hopefully)

Boris Johnson told the nation at the end of October that ‘Christmas may be very different this year’ as England heads for its second national lockdown. Pubs, restaurants, gyms and non-essential shops will have to close for four weeks from Thursday the 5th of November. But unlike the restrictions in spring, schools, colleges and universities can stay open.

The prime minister told a Downing Street news conference that he was ‘truly, truly sorry’ for the impact on businesses, but said the furlough system paying 80% of employee wages will be extended through November.

Its round 2, folks. Let’s deal with this as well (and hopefully better) than we did last time.

Carlsberg raises Full-Year Forecast after 3rd Quarter

Carlsberg has raised its profit forecast for the current full year after reporting an improved performance for its fiscal third quarter. For the three months to 30 September, revenues were down 6.8% to 17.3 billion kroner, a significant improvement from the 16.6% drop in the second quarter.  Crucially, overall volumes were up 2.4% on an organic basis, compared to a 7.7% slide in the previous quarter

During the quarter, volumes of Carlsberg’s beer brands rose by 3.2% on an organic basis, as growth in Western and Eastern Europe offset a slight decline in Asia.  Meanwhile, non-beer volumes edged down 1.9%, as a drop in Western Europe offset growth in Asia and Eastern Europe.  Carlsberg’s craft & speciality brands recorded a 12% increase, while alcohol-free brands registered a 29% jump.

Amazon launches dedicated eco-friendly platform

Amazon has launched a new dedicated ‘eco-friendly’ shopping platform to help consumers in the UK and Europe find household products that are driving the sustainability movement forward. The platform lists more than 40,000 items that will carry certificates from the likes of Fairtrade International and the Carbon Trust.

The move has been made as a means of enabling customers to pick products on their environmental merits. It follows Amazon’s recent step forwards in the sustainability drive, when it launched its Climate Pledge Friendly label in September this year.

The online goliath has come under fire for its use of excessive cardboard and other packaging materials, and last year faced burning criticism for using new-style packaging that could not be recycled. The new scheme has been billed as its own step to ‘lessen the company’s impact on the environment.’ Good for them, it’s always good to see a company go green then go greener.